Justice Scalia to Law Students: If Taxes Become Too High ‘Perhaps You Should Revolt’

Mike Paczesny | The Rundown Live489792_t607

During an event at the University of Tennessee’s law school, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia suggested that the crowd should revolt against U.S government if their taxes get too high.

A student asked Scalia about the constitutionality of a federal income tax.

Scalia responded that the government has the right to implement the tax, “but if it reaches a certain point, perhaps you should revolt.”

You’re entitled to criticize the government, and you can use words, you can use symbols, you can use telegraph, you can use Morse code, you can burn a flag,”

Scalia said that the justices aren’t swayed by partisan political spats, and that he doesn’t care which party controls the White House. He also expressed his theory of originalism, or that the U.S. Constitution is a fixed law and is not open to evolution or change over time.

The Constitution is not a living organism for Pete’s sake, It’s a law. It means what it meant when it was adopted.”

Scalia also predicts that the Supreme Court will eventually authorize another a wartime abuse of civil rights such as the internment camps.

You are kidding yourself if you think the same thing will not happen again,”

Supreme Court justices have largely refrained from such rhetoric.

Scalia recently talked about the First Amendment and NSA wiretapping.

Justice Scalia said, “No because it’s not absolute. As Ruth has said there are very few freedoms that are absolute. I mean your person is protected by the Fourth Amendment but as I pointed out when you board a plane someone can pass his hands all over your body that’s a terrible intrusion, but given the danger that it’s guarding against it’s not an unreasonable intrusion. And it can be the same thing with acquiring this data that is regarded as effects. That’s why I say its foolish to have us make the decision because I don’t know how serious the danger is in this NSA stuff, I really don’t.”

 

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