Big Pharma’s Attempt At Cannabis-Based Drug Fails Clinical Study

GW Pharmaceuticals, a British pharmaceutical company, hoped that a new cannabis drug would have an impact on pain in cancer patients, but much to their dismay failed to do so in a clinical study. This revelation coincided with a 21% drop in their stock on Thursday.

GW was developing the drug Sativex for pain, but according to three late-stage trials found that there was no statistically significant difference between subjects receiving the drug and subjects receiving the placebo.

GW Chief Executive Justin Glover said that the findings were both disappointing and surprising, given encouraging earlier results. The company’s scientists aren’t giving up hope.

“Although we missed the primary endpoint in this trial, based upon the positive data seen in the Phase II programme, we remain confident in the ability for sativex to relieve cancer pain in this patient population,” Glover said.

Sativex is an under-the-tongue spray that has already been approved for treating spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis, though not yet in the US.

GW is also developing other cannabis-based drugs, such as Epidiolex, which has shown promising results in children who suffer from types of epilepsy that are difficult to treat.

Let’s here what you have to say about this. Is it good use of time and energy to try to extract compounds of cannabis into pill form to help alleviate symptoms from a variety of diseases, or should it be left simply to direct consumption of the plant?

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